Western corporate media ‘disappears’ over 1.5 million Syrians and 4,000 doctors

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-Eva Bartlett

Aug 14, 2016, SOTT.net

-(Global Research, Strategic Culture Foundation)

As the Syrian Arab Army and Syrian government make more significant advances in restoring security to northern Syria’s Aleppo and its population, war-propagandizing human rights groups posing as neutral, and Western media (and Gulf counterparts like Al Jazeera) churn out recycled and debunked accusations anew.

According to these compromised US government and Soros-funded NGOs and much of the corporate media, there is only one “last” pediatrician and a scarce number of doctors left in Aleppo. They are, of course, referring solely to the terrorist-occupied regions of Aleppo (eastern and some northern quarters) and even then ignore the reality that the Syrian government continues to pay the salaries of doctors in terrorist-occupied areas, including eastern Aleppo.

This “last-pediatrician” assertion was put forth earlier this year as part of a media frenzy attempting to vilify Syria and Russia as “targeting civilians” (when in fact targeting foreign-backed terrorists). Those media and human rights hyenas ignored the following realities about greater Aleppo:

  • The presence of terrorists (Jabhat al-Nusra, and what the west calls “moderates” — Ahrar al-Sham, Jaysh al-Fateh, Nour al-Din al-Zenki, and factions of the so-called Free Syrian Army) in eastern and northern Aleppo.
  • The presence of over 1.5 million civilians in the government-secured areas of western Aleppo, who are murdered and maimed daily by terrorist-fired, US/Turkish-made rockets, missiles, mortars and ammunition, as well as explosive bullets, and locally-produced explosive-stuffed gas canisters and mortars.
  • The presence in government-secured Aleppo of civilians from terrorist-occupied areas of Aleppo — many of whom as early as 2012 fled the influx of terrorists to their districts, others who over the years since have fled west, and a small number of whom have recently been able to flee via humanitarian corridors to safety in western Aleppo.
  • The presence of not just one, but over 4,100 doctors (source: Aleppo Medical Association) and numerous functioning hospitals in Aleppo — in spite of the criminal western sanctions on Syria and in spite of hospitals having been targeted by terrorists’ bombings.
  • The fact that the terrorists in eastern Aleppo are predominantly non-Syrian (and certainly non-“rebels”), coming “from eighty-one different countries with significant contingents from Turkey, the Gulf Arab states, North Africa, and Russia’s Chechnya and North Caucasus region.” [source: 10 Facts About Aleppo]
  • That at least 80% of the terrorists are affiliated with Al-Qaeda and the majority of the remaining otherwise hold the same distorted and ruthless ideologies. [source: 10 Facts About Aleppo]

Doctors In Aleppo Refute Media Lies

In the first week of July 2016 I traveled by car to Aleppo. When entering the southern Ramouseh district of the city, the car sped along a road known for terrorist snipers. Three weeks later in Ramouseh, a woman was sniped by a terrorist and killed.

© Eva Bartlett: Oil barrels line Ramouseh road to protect Syrian civilians against Western-backed terrorist snipers
 

In Aleppo, I met with doctors from the Aleppo Medical Association (established in 1959), including Dr. Zahar Buttal, Dr. Tony Sayegh, and Dr. Nabil Antaki.

One question I posed to the doctors was regarding the other oft-repeated lie of the “last pediatrician” in Aleppo, a startling allegation designed to shock western readers and rally them against the Syrian government. And one which has no basis in truth.
CONTINUE READING

Updates From on the Ground in Syria: June to August 11

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*Entering Aleppo city, a 500 metre stretch of the Ramouseh road is lethal due to terrorists’ sniping and shelling.

*Published at Dissident Voice

Since June 13, 2016I have been visiting different regions of Syria but have not had sufficient time to post regularly.  However, until I am able to, I will share some brief updates I had shared on social media, and otherwise refer to my writings/photos/videos from my prior 4 visits.

*

Down the Terrorist-Sniped Road to Aleppo, the Only Entrance to a City of over 1.5 Million (July visit)

 

Going through my files, I found two short clips. In the first clip, the driver says terrorists are 200 metres from the cement factory we will pass. The second video is driving along the road in Ramouseh neighbourhood, a road which is heavily sniped by terrorists occupying the region beyond the cement factory in Sheikh Saeed..This is the only means for Aleppo’s residents to exit/enter, as well as the trucks which supply the city with produce, meat, medicines, fuel… When terrorists cut the road, Aleppo citizens suffer.

When I visited Aleppo the first week of July, I wrote the following in a notebook:

“Entering the outskirts of the city, driver points to a cement factory roughly 400 m away. Beyond that factory, in Sheikh Saeed, terrorists, he says. We pass barrels stacked to screen cars from terrorist snipers’ bullets, then embankments of sand and earth, for the same purpose. Dipping into a small valley, a block of apartments in al-Ramouseh is in view.

The driver opens the car windows, explaining that, “here many mortars fall” (in which case, better to have window open, in case a mortar landed, so windows won’t shatter from the pressure). He says for the next 500 metres the risk of snipers’ bullets is high, that five of his friends were killed along this stretch. The car speeds along the road until a safe point is reached.”

*

SANA reports that on Jul 27, “One woman was killed and five others were injured by a terrorist sniper attack in al-Ramouseh neighborhood in Aleppo city. …terrorists targeted citizens’ homes in al-Ramouseh neighborhood on Wednesday morning with sniper gunfire in an indiscriminate manner, claiming the life of one woman and inflicting injuries of varying severity on five others.” (http://sana.sy/en/?p=83711)

CONTINUE READING

Terrorists’ Attack on Damascus Restaurant and Homes: “They have no humanity and no respect for children”

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On July 25, I visited the Qamar al-Sham restaurant which on July 24 was hit by terrorist shelling, killing and injuring many of the civilians inside, including at least 2 children, one of whom was an infant.

Rebel-shells-3-688x516*photo via Al Masdar News

When I visited the restaurant on July 25, it had been mostly cleaned up of debris, but still stank of blood. While the media reports I’ve seen have varied (early reports saying five had been murdered and others saying eight victims) the employees said eleven civilians were killed, including the 7 year old son of one of the restaurant managers, and an infant and his mother. They said the infant’s body was found an hour after the attack, inside a small room off the main room.

DSCN4020*Room in which Riad (the mudered infant)’s body was found.

A Syrian friend, Sam Bitar, noted that the murdered young woman and her infant were the sister and nephew of his dear friend.  CONTINUE READING

Interview: Eva Bartlett, Live from Damascus (21st Century Wire)

*centre: with Rev. Ibrahim Nseir, in Aleppo; right: with Grand Mufti, Dr. Ahmad Badr Al-Din Hassoun

July 24, 2016, Patrick Henningsen, Sunday Wire, 21st Century Wire

“In the third hour, we’ll go live to Damascus to talk with independent journalist Eva Bartlett about recent experiences in Syria, specifically along the front lines of the conflict in Latakia and Aleppo, as well as some new information about which direct this 5 year-long conflict may actually be heading.”

https://www.spreaker.com/embed/player/standard?episode_id=9050561&autoplay=false

Starts in hour three of Patrick’s always informative broadcast, at around 113:00.

LISTEN here if above link does not work.

POST CONTINUES

Volunteerism in Syria: a journalist’s journey to the heart of Syria

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*Volunteers from the Saaed Association after Eid activities for children in Damascus.

Jul 24, 2016, American Herald Tribune

-Eva Bartlett

Syria has long been celebrated not only for its rich historical and cultural mosaic but also for its modern culture, secularism, sheltering refugees from neighbouring countries—including Palestinian refugees who are treated as well as Syrians and with the same rights, and its socialist provisions for the Syrian people, among which are free education and health care.

Yet, since 2011, in the minds of many outside of Syria, the country has largely been equated with the death and destruction of the NATO-GCC-Zionist-Turkish alliance’s pre-meditated war on Syria.

Unless one is actively-seeking information on positive aspects of life in the Syrian Arab Republic—which, perhaps to the surprise, many do abound—it is images of war which overwhelm.

One of many positive aspects that prevails in Syria is the spirit of volunteerism, throughout the country. Syrians of varying ages and faiths, in ad hoc groups or established non-profit charities, have been quietly working to help and support those rendered less-fortunate by war and the immoral western sanctions on Syria.

During the month of Ramadan, many volunteer associations (Christian and Muslim) provided hot meals to Syria’s poorest. One of these is was the Saaed Association‘s “No to Hunger” initiative, in which volunteers prepared Iftar (the fast-breaking meal) for some of Damascus’ most impoverished residents.

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Essam Habbl, Director of Saaed, said while at the start of Ramadan volunteers in Damascus were cooking 3,000 Iftar meals daily, by the end of the holy month, the number had more than tripled to 10,000 meals a day. This was the fourth year of this program in Damascus. In Hama and Homs, for the first year, volunteers provided another 7,000 meals per day.  CONTINUE READING

Damascus, Life Returns 5 Years After NATO Destabilization Efforts: A snapshot of life in Damascus, June and July 2016

The croissant stand in Aamarie district of Thomas Gate is known not only to Damascenes but visitors from other areas of Syria. While prices for most goods have risen all across Syria, the stand keeps its prices low: 125 Syrian pounds per sumptuous croissant. On the first day of 'Eid celebrations the stand is packed.

The croissant stand in Aamariya district of Thomas Gate is known not only to Damascenes but visitors from other areas of Syria. While prices for most goods have risen all across Syria, the stand keeps its prices low: 125 Syrian pounds per sumptuous croissant. On the first day of ‘Eid celebrations the stand is packed.

Life for many in Damascus, Syria, is beginning to regain a sense of normalcy. Once besieged by foreign fighters, the ancient city and its residents struggle to rebuild their lives, land and livelihood, rejoicing in the simple mundanity of day-to-day life.

July 20, 2016, MintPress News (Global Research, Uprooted Palestinians)

Damascus, Eva Bartlett — On prior visits to Damascus, staying in the Old City, the sound of mortars being fired from terrorist-held districts outside of the city was a constant. In recent months, the mortars on Damascus have stopped. Previously, Jebhat al-Nusra (Al Qaeda in Syria), Jaysh al-Islam and the Free Syrian Army, among other terrorist factions, rained mortars daily on residential areas of Damascus, hitting schools, homes, vehicles and pedestrians, killing and maiming indiscriminately, leaving civilians, including children, with critical injuries and amputations.

With the recent absence of mortars, Damascenes have opened outdoor establishments where before it was formerly too dangerous. Sidewalks cafes and outdoor eateries open at night were unthinkable less than half a year ago, let alone rooftop cafes and lounges. Although Syrians nation-wide suffer immensely from an economy devastated by war and western sanctions, in Damascus there is a renewed sense of defiance, a refusal to give in, or as a young man in his twenties visiting from Aleppo said: “They have their own war against death by living.”

A snapshot of life in Damascus, June and July 2016:

Wedding procession in the Old City of Damascus. Love and life continue. A newcomer to Syria might be surprised by the vibrancy of life among Damascus residents, who have lived under al-Nusra and Jaysh al-Islam mortars for years, as well as cruel sanctions. “Tawadna” is a phrase that is heard often in Syria: “We got used to it.” Even when mortars rained down, Syrians celebrated their weddings and festivals. Now, in Damascus at least, it is safer to do so outside.

Wedding procession in the Old City of Damascus. Love and life continue. A newcomer to Syria might be surprised by the vibrancy of life among Damascus residents, who have lived under al-Nusra and Jaysh al-Islam mortars for years, as well as cruel sanctions. “Tawadna” is a phrase that is heard often in Syria: “We got used to it.” Even when mortars rained down, Syrians celebrated their weddings and festivals. Now, at least, it is safer to do so outside.

 

The book market near the President's Bridge and Damascus Univeristy is an institution in Damascus, known to book lovers who can't afford bookstores. It is one Damascus venue which refused to shut down over the years, mortars or not. In addition to its Arabic books, one can find English language books and cookbooks, English literature, popular English-language thrillers and taudry romance novels.

The book market near the President’s Bridge and Damascus University is an institution in Damascus, known to book lovers who can’t afford regular bookstores. It is one Damascus venue which refused to shut down over the years, mortars or not. In addition to Arabic books, one can find English language books and cookbooks, English literature, popular English-language thrillers and taudry romance novels.

 

In the narrow lanes of Old Damascus, a wooden mosaic artisan explains the techniques of his trade. The tediously-crafted and beautiful woodwork is a favourite for tourists. In spite of the dearth of customers in the past five and a half years, craftsmen and women continue to practise their skills in hopes that when peace returns to Syria, so too will tourists.

In the narrow lanes of Old Damascus, a wooden mosaic artisan explains the techniques of his trade. The tediously-crafted and beautiful woodwork is a favourite for tourists. In spite of the dearth of customers in the past five and a half years, craftsmen and women continue to practise their skills in hopes that when peace returns to Syria, so too will tourists.  POST CONTINUES

Interview on Syria and related, on the Richie Allen Show

*June 8 interview

Related Links:

-on Dr. Bouthaina Shaaban:
-Israel is treating al-Qaeda terrorists in their hospitals:
“Israel is treating al-Qaeda terrorists in their hospitals and enabling their transit back and forth into Syria, as well as arming them—even Israeli media have reported that Israel is providing aid to al-Qaeda terrorists; even the UN has reported on Israeli soldiers interacting with Jebhat al-Nusra in the occupied Syrian Golan;”
-on *actual* hospitals bombed in Aleppo (by western-backed terrorists):

POST CONTINUES